Friday, February 06, 2009

Cherry Shrimps


This is my cherry shrimps tank.
I brought some additonal plants yesterday and re-do the landscaping.
There are approximately about 50-60 cherry shrimps inside.
I would give an estimate count of this little shrimps daily.
To check on them and if the count seems much lesser, something must be wrong with the water conditions, ph level...etc.
I had my entire tank of shrimps "Wipe Out" a few times too.
Sometimes, added new plants into the tank can be fatal too.
Now, whenever I buy new plants, I soaked them into another pail of de-chlorinated water for few hours or overnight, before introducing them into the tank.
Shrimps are also very sensitive to sudden water temp. and PH changes.
They like colder water.
I've tried Blue shrimps, Crystal shrimps, Tiger Shrimps, Green Shrimps, Bee Shrimps...
Sadly, all died!
These shrimps needs a chiller because they require a water temp at about 25°C.
My water temp is about 29-31°C.
So far, only cherry shrimps is able to survive in my environment as I do not have a chiller.





A young cherry shrimp. this cherry shrimp is only 1.5cm in length.

Cherry Shrimp on a moss ball.


Cherry Shrimp Data :
Scientific Name : Neocaridina denticulata Sinensis / Neocaridina Heteropoda
Max. Adult Size : 1.5 inch (4 cm)
Sex : Females slightly larger
Longevity : 1 - 2 years
Food : They may look small, but they do eat alot. Loves algae.
Sensitive : Copper, aquarium medications, ammonia
Water Temp : 25 to 27 degrees celcius
Ph Level : 6.2 to 7.0
Origin : Taiwan
Behaviour : Non-aggressive, very social
Housing : Strive better in planted tank. Not suitable to be kept with other fishes.
Breeding :
When the female is ready to lay the eggs, she will releases pheromones into the water to signal the male shrimp. The male shrimp will start to become agitated, swimming actively to search for the source of the pheromones. After mating, the female lays her eggs and affixes them to her swimmerettes.
Eggs can be seen developing in the female's overies.
Young hatches are very tiny, about 1mm in size. They usually spent your first few days hiding among plants and moss.



Feeding on sinking tablet food.
Feeding time is also good for doing a the shrimps count.


Shrimps are great acrobatics, very flexible body!




I've been keeping shrimps for about 2 years now and still enjoy looking at them.
They always seem busy. Leaping here and jumping there.
Looking for food and scraping for alage.
Rather active little ones.
I've noticed that they seemed to enjoy playing near the outlet of the water pump.
They'll swim near the water outlet and go with the flow of the water.
Let the flow bring them to another part of the tank and then they would swim back to the pump outlet, again..
This will go on and on for a few times, till they grew tired of it.
Cherry shrimps are more tolerance and hardy as compared to other shrimps.
It's also a joy when the shrimps breed and gave births.
The baby are so tiny and transparent, it's fun when I managed to spot them after almost sticking my face on the aquarium glass.
If anyone is interested in starting a shrimp keeping hobby, I would recommend to start with cherry shrimps.
They are very interesting and will keep you amused everytime you look at them.





10 comments:

Charles Bjørnsen Ravndal said...

Lovely photos and they look so adorable and cute!

astrogalaxy said...

Thanks Charles for your sweet comment!
Cheers and have a wonderful week!

Charles Bjørnsen Ravndal said...

You're always welcome! You have a wonderful week too! Btw, are those shrimps not hard to maintain?

astrogalaxy said...

I find cherry shrimps much easier to care for compared to other small shrimps.
Once a week, I change about 20%-30%of the tank water and washing the filter sponge is sufficient.
(Water need to be de-cholrinated first or leaving a pail of water overnight before changing water the next day.)
If your country weather is cooling, it's even better for them.
They reproduced offspings better and faster in cooler environment.
Oh yes... and they love moss.

Darrel said...

I used to breed Black Mollies but I don't think I could handle shrimp
By the way...I couldn't find your email so here is the answer to your comment on my blog

This topic has been close to my heart for a long time. How many people have misunderstood mental illness down thru the years.
Thanks for your comment
darrel
whydepression.info

astrogalaxy said...

Hi darrel,
I do like mollies too!
At the moment I have 4 orange color balloon mollies, they are really cute!
And also you are most welcome to leave me comments anytime.
Take care!

Argentum Vulgaris said...

Great post, nice photos, I have never considered keeping nor raising shrimp. I used to have several aquariums years ago when I was married and used to breed cichlids.

I came here from Darrel's blog.

AV
http://netherregionoftheearthii.blogspot.com/
http://tomusarcanum.blogspot.com/

astrogalaxy said...

Hi AV,
I used to keep cichlids many years ago. They are the most colourful for freshwater fishes. But gave up due to their aggressive behaviour towards their own species.
Thank you for visiting and leaving me a comment.
Have a great week!

neha said...


breeding oscar

This is the first time I’ve read about this. I keep learning new things everyday!

astrogalaxy said...

Hi Neha,
Thanks for visiting. I've also visited your link.
Happy fish keeping!